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This is a Tumblr log of curated links, news and resources. We update it almost daily, so please be sure to scroll down to the bottom of this page to catch the latest posts.

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As Chief Imagination Officer of Creative Sage™, I live a passionate personal mission to cause the spontaneous combustion of creativity, innovation, and compassionate intelligence everywhere!

At Creative Sage™, we help corporations, nonprofit organizations, professional associations, project teams, entrepreneurs, consultants, authors, artists, performers and others to create outstanding marketing strategies, communications, solutions, services and products. We design dynamic, cutting-edge innovation programs that are tailored to our clients' individual needs for maximum return on investment in innovation management.

We coach and mentor executives, and we also coach accomplished, creative professionals and their organizations to revolutionize the concept of "retirement" and create powerful new lives, projects and initiatives, including Social Entrepreneur projects and partnerships between corporations, nonprofits and philanthropists. We use highly creative and effective methods to help people in mid-life or at any age to navigate transitions in business or in life. We'll coach your inner innovator out of hiding...we help you innovate to be great!


Cathryn Hrudicka & Associates was our original company name, where we've focused on marketing communications, public relations, fundraising, performing arts presentation, and management consulting in the entertainment industry and nonprofit arts. Known for our innovative approaches and story angles, and our strategic capabilities, we have also served a variety of business and technology clients, including working in various capacities on multimedia and marketing projects for Fortune 500s, major universities, healthcare companies, environmental/sustainability, and trade associations. We've also added social media and Internet marketing and PR to our mix of services. We bring your message to the world, and the world to you. Let's start a conversation!

~Cathryn Hrudicka, Chief Imagination Officer, Creative Sage™/ Cathryn Hrudicka & Associates


Contact Me to set up a phone or Skype appointment, or for more information. I look forward to discussing how we can help you or work with you to achieve extraordinary results.

Please scroll down for valuable links, news and resources. At the bottom of each page, click "next" to continue on to the next page. You can subscribe by clcking on "RSS" at the top right corner of this Tumblr log.


I'm honored to be a contributing author to the 2011 best-selling business book, A Guide to Open Innovation & Crowd Sourcing: Advice from Leading Experts, along with some of my innovation colleagues from #Innochat (Twitter Innovation chat and web site), and Innovation Excellence; the book was edited by Paul Sloane, with a foreword by Henry Chesbrough. You can order it here: http://amzn.to/OI_CS

I co-wrote the chapter, "Building the Culture for Open Innovation and Crowd Sourcing," with Gwen Ishmael and Boris Pluskowski — more information about all of the co-authors and the contents of this book at: http://bit.ly/OI_CS_Google

Sep 16
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Passive data is your digital footprint, bits that have been left behind as you go about your day. This trail of bits could come from anywhere – from interacting with branded content on social media, to swiping your credit card to pay for a taxi. Just a few seconds ago, you generated a few bits of passive data by clicking on a link to read this article.

Being “passive”, this data is not something that you generate consciously. Passive data is a byproduct of your everyday technological existence, which is why many people are not aware of its intrinsic monetary value.

Like a raw material, passive data can be mined and used in many different ways. Advertisers can use your browser history to predict what kind of product you are likely to buy; health organizations can use the purchasing patterns of you and your neighbours to gauge when an influenza outbreak is coming. A lot of different types of organizations can extract value from your passive data. Right now, that’s exactly what they are doing, to the tune of hundreds of billions of dollars.

There is a whole industry of high-value businesses – which operate rather euphemistically as data management platforms – built around the capture of individual data. According to the Data-Driven Marketing Institute, this industry generated $156 billion dollars in revenue in 2012 – approximately $60 per every one of the world’s 2.5 billion internet users.

As impressive as this figure sounds, it really is just the first step for the data economy. By the end of the decade, the global internet population will reach 5 billion, and the amount of data will grow exponentially with the addition of 10 billion machine-to-machine connections and a 11-fold rise in mobile data traffic. With an increase in applications across industries, it’s reasonable to project that individual data will soon be worth over $100 per internet user. Within just 10 years, this industry will be generating more than half a trillion dollars per year.

So, as creators of this multibillion-dollar data, will individuals like you and I be compensated?

[Excerpt, click on the link to read the rest of this post.]

From: The World Economic Forum / Forum:Blog — What’s the value of your personal data?

By Nathan Eagle

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Scientists striving to cure Alzheimer’s disease and other brain disorders are turning to a powerful new tool they hope will light the way to effective treatments: big data.

The idea is to use supercomputers to search through reams of patient data – everything from MRI scans to the results of cognitive testing to lipid levels – for patterns that might reveal the precise cause of neurodegenerative disorders, which have so far proved stubbornly difficult to predict, halt or even slow down.

But figuring out how best to share information from potentially tens of thousands of people around the world is proving to be a legal, ethical and logistical challenge, which is why the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development convened a workshop on the subject in Toronto on Monday, one of the first gatherings of its kind.

“Up until really quite recently, most of these studies have tried to link together one or two variables. So we have [brain] imaging and we look at cognition or we have genetics and we look at behaviour,” said Michael Strong, dean of the school of medicine and dentistry at the University of Western Ontario in London.

But tying together a dozen or more variables across diseases in a single database, “that’s really quite new,” Dr. Strong said. “We’re really on the cusp.”

Dr. Strong, the lead investigator for a $28.5-million Ontario research project that intends to harness big data to better understand brain diseases, attended the OECD workshop along with more than 50 other scientists, doctors, policy experts, computing whizzes and patient advocates.

[Excerpt, click on the link to read the rest of this post.]

From: The Globe and Mail — Using big data to fight dementia and Alzheimer’s

By Kelly Grant, Health Reporter

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From clean water supplies to the polio vaccine, the most effective public health interventions are typically preventative policies that help stop a crisis before it starts. But predicting the next public health crisis has historically been a challenge, and even interventions like chlorinating water or distributing a vaccine are in many ways reactive. Thanks to predictive analytics, we are piloting new ways to predict public health challenges, so we can intervene and stop them before they ever begin.

We can use predictive analytics to leverage seemingly unrelated data to predict who is most susceptible to birth complications or chronic diseases or where and when a virulent outbreak is most likely to occur. With this information, public health officials should be able to respond before the issue manifests itself – providing the right prenatal treatments to mitigate birth complications, identifying those most likely to be exposed to lead or finding food establishments most at risk for violations. With this information, data becomes actionable. Predictive analytics has the potential to transform both how government operates and how resources are allocated, thereby improving the public’s health.

While the greatest benefits have yet to be realized, at the Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH), we are already leveraging data and history to make smarter, more targeted decisions. Today, we are piloting predictive analytic models within our food protection, tobacco control policy, and lead inspection programs.

[Excerpt, click on the link to read the rest of this post.]

From: Harvard Business Review Blogs — How Cities Are Using Analytics to Improve Public Health

By Bechara Choucair, Jay Bhatt, and Raed Mansour

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The MBA is now the most popular master’s degree in the U.S., making up one quarter of all such degrees conferred. But a few schools are recognizing that a different course of study might better serve both aspiring business leaders and the world at large: a master’s in social work.

The University of Southern California’s School of Social Work just launched a business concentration for its students, and a number of universities now offer joint MBA-MSW degrees.

The cynical might assume that social workers are simply trying to make more money as government and social service budgets continue to shrink. (And why shouldn’t MSWs be able to pay off their student loans like everyone else?)

But a number of corporate failures demonstrate the need for the very skills that social workers are trained in. At the same time, the MBA has come under fire for producing some of the leaders that brought on those failures—former Enron CEO and Harvard Business School grad Jeffrey Skilling comes to mind—and perpetuating the shareholder primacy mantra that has pushed the interests of business and the interests of society so far apart.

The USC program aims to produce “system thinkers who focus on the big picture, keeping in mind that businesses affect not only their employees and their families, but also the communities that depend on them.” All companies—and society at large—could benefit from that mindset. In addition to foundational courses and a field practicum, students in the business concentration can take classes focused on translating social work theories and skills to corporate environments.

[Excerpt, click on the link to read the rest of this post.]

From: FastCo.Exist — Is The MSW The New MBA?

Recent corporate failures demonstrate the need for the very skills that social workers bring. Now a few schools are recognizing this and offering joint tracks that merge the interests of businesses and the communities they work in.

By Christine Bader

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At Creative Sage™, we love to connect corporate leaders and entrepreneurs with good causes, and help companies start Corporate Social Responsibility, Social Entrepreneurship, or philanthropy programs that are a win-win for all partners.

Please do not hesitate to email us if you would like to discuss your situation and find out more about how we can help your organization move forward to a more innovative and profitable future, strengthening your branding and resonance with customers while helping to do good in the world through appropriate CSR partnerships with nonprofits, philanthropists, educational institutions and programs, or government agencies and community organizations. We can also help you connect with celebrities and other notable people who can help amplify your message of social good, or headline entertainment events and concerts for good causes.

You can also call us at 1-510-845-5510 in San Francisco / Silicon Valley. We look forward to talking with you!

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Sep 15
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Via theweekmagazine:

The underrated skill that can benefit every area of your life
Here’s what storytelling can do for you. 
[Click on the link to read the rest of this post.]

Via theweekmagazine:

The underrated skill that can benefit every area of your life

Here’s what storytelling can do for you.

[Click on the link to read the rest of this post.]

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This summer, The New Republic published the most read article in that magazine’s history. It was an essay by William Deresiewicz, drawn from his new book, “Excellent Sheep: The Miseducation of the American Elite and the Way to a Meaningful Life.”

Deresiewicz offers a vision of what it takes to move from adolescence to adulthood. Everyone is born with a mind, he writes, but it is only through introspection, observation, connecting the head and the heart, making meaning of experience and finding an organizing purpose that you build a unique individual self.

This process, he argues, often begins in college, the interval of freedom when a person is away from both family and career. During that interval, the young person can throw himself with reckless abandon at other people and learn from them.

Some of these people are authors who have written great books. Some are professors who can teach intellectual rigor. Some are students who can share work that is intrinsically rewarding.

Through this process, a student is able, in the words of Mark Lilla, a professor at Columbia, to discover “just what it is that’s worth wanting.”

Deresiewicz argues that most students do not get to experience this in elite colleges today. Universities, he says, have been absorbed into the commercial ethos. Instead of being intervals of freedom, they are breeding grounds for advancement. Students are too busy jumping through the next hurdle in the résumé race to figure out what they really want. They are too frantic tasting everything on the smorgasbord to have life-altering encounters. They have a terror of closing off options. They have been inculcated with a lust for prestige and a fear of doing things that may put their status at risk.

The system pressures them to be excellent, but excellent sheep.

[Excerpt, click on the link to read the rest of this Op Ed piece.]

From: NYTimes.com / The Opinion Pages — Becoming a Real Person

By David Brooks, Op-Ed Columnist

Sep 12
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We thought it would be a fun summer activity to pull together a list of the top innovation personalities and information sharers on twitter. We knew we follow a lot of great innovation people on twitter (including a lot of the great Innovation Excellence authors) and we were curious to see who you follow or who you think people should investigate to learn more about. We received lots of nominations, mixed them together with some of our favorites and compiled them into a list to share back with you.

So without further delay, here in no particular order is a list of some of our Top 50 Innovation Tweeters of 2014…

[Excerpt, click on the link to read the original post, and to get the list of Top Innovation Twitter Sharers of 2014!]

From: Innovation Excellence — Top 50 Innovation Twitter Sharers of 2014

Post by Braden Kelley

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We are proud and honored to have had our @CreativeSage company Twitter account chosen for the third year in a row (2012, 2013, and 2014) for the Top 50 Innovation Twitter Sharers List! We want to thank Innovation Excellence and everyone in our community who voted for our account.

Additionally, Founder/CEO/Chief Imagination Officer Cathryn Hrudicka maintains a multidisciplinary artist account at @CathrynHrudicka that some of you may want to follow, too (many people follow both accounts).

At Creative Sage™, we love to work with clients on social innovation, educational innovation, healthcare innovation, and government innovation projects, as well as corporate innovation projects. Our core capabilities include creativity training and coaching, and the design and facilitation of innovation programs, including in the areas of design thinking, arts-based processes, applications of science and neuroscience tools when appropriate, and business model innovation. We have been very effective in helping organizational leaders and employees move through transitions and cultural changes.

Please do not hesitate to contact us if you would like to discuss your situation and how we can help your organization move forward to a more innovative and profitable future. You can also call us at 1-510-845-5510 in San Francisco / Silicon Valley. We look forward to helping you find the path to luminous creativity and continuous innovation!

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Sep 11
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artnet:

In honor and memory of those who lost their lives, we remember.
Image: Josef Hoflehner.

artnet:

In honor and memory of those who lost their lives, we remember.

Image: Josef Hoflehner.

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aflcio:

Today we honor the lives that were lost and remember the brave first responders that are still suffering.We are stronger together. 

aflcio:

Today we honor the lives that were lost and remember the brave first responders that are still suffering.

We are stronger together. 

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americasgreatoutdoors:

On Tuesday morning, September 11, 2001, the U.S. came under attack when four commercial airliners were hijacked and used to strike targets on the ground. Nearly 3,000 people tragically lost their lives. Because of the actions of the 40 passengers and crew aboard one of the planes, Flight 93, the attack on the U.S. Capitol was thwarted. Today the National Park Service, its volunteers, and its partners work to honor their sacrifice and to try to understand more fully the legacy of Flight 93 and the other events of 9/11.Photo from the Flight 93 National Memorial: Tami A. Heilemann

americasgreatoutdoors:

On Tuesday morning, September 11, 2001, the U.S. came under attack when four commercial airliners were hijacked and used to strike targets on the ground. Nearly 3,000 people tragically lost their lives. Because of the actions of the 40 passengers and crew aboard one of the planes, Flight 93, the attack on the U.S. Capitol was thwarted.

Today the National Park Service, its volunteers, and its partners work to honor their sacrifice and to try to understand more fully the legacy of Flight 93 and the other events of 9/11.

Photo from the Flight 93 National Memorial: Tami A. Heilemann

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tribecafilm:

Here’s Where You Can Volunteer Today

We also honor those who bravely served at the Pentagon in Washington D.C., who were injured or passed away on 9/11. Never forget. Peace be with you. - C.H.
Sep 10
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Via staff:

Today’s the day. The day you help save the internet from being ruined.

Ready? 

Yes, you are, and we’re ready to help you.

(Long story short: The FCC is about to make a critical decision as to whether or not internet service providers have to treat all traffic equally. If they choose wrong, then the internet where anyone can start a website for any reason at all, the internet that’s been so momentous, funny, weird, and surprising—that internet could cease to exist. Here’s your chance to preserve a beautiful thing.)

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One of the most important factors in growing your startup is hiring and building a great team around it. But how can you make sure that you’ve found the right people to help your business succeed?

Searching for the right employees is a difficult task that shouldn’t be taken lightly. You have to make sure that you find someone who clicks with the culture, not to mention talented and willing to embark on this risky journey known as startup life. Over the past four months I’ve been searching for the best team in the world for a project that I’ve been working on. It’s not easy, especially when you’re not able to pay them much and you’re living in Silicon Valley.

Below are some suggestions that I’ve found very useful to find top talent in today’s market.

Have a Candidate in Mind

Before going through applications and the interview process, you should have a clear idea of the type of person you want to hire. Asking yourself a question like “What positions need to be filled and by when?” is a great starting-off point. You should have a question like “Why would this person want this job?” prepared as well. Is it because of the atmosphere? Salary? Location? Knowing why a candidate would accept your job offer determines how passionate and dedicated he or she is to the culture of your brand.

I highly recommend that you write these needs down on a piece of paper to really cement in your brain exactly the person that you want to have working for your company.

[Excerpt, click on the link to read the rest of this post.]

From: Inc.com — How to Hire Top Talent in Silicon Valley

Here’s what you need to know to identify and attract the best candidates in the Valley and other tech hubs.

By John Rampton

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Now, entrepreneurs and organizational leaders from other cities and countries can have access to Silicon Valley companies to learn from their cultures, hiring, leadership and innovation methods! Come join us for a dynamic, unforgettable, and very enjoyable Innovation Tour in the San Francisco Bay Area, Silicon Valley, in the Wine Country, or on the beautiful, rural, Northern California seacoast in Mendocino County!

At Creative Sage™, we design high impact, customized creativity, innovation, and leadership programs, and we are now offering related tours, events and workshops in wonderful urban and rural settings that will spark your imagination — and your team’s — to come up with brilliant ideas and plan how to implement new innovations in services, products, your organization’s business model, operations, or in any other area. We use the latest in value-tested creativity and innovation techniques and processes; and we select world-class facilitators and partners to help your organization gain lasting value from your experience working — and playing — with us. Creativity and innovation processes could include design thinking, business model canvas, arts-based, interactive creativity activities, lateral thinking, gamification, or other proven methods.

We also work on workplace culture issues, leadership challenges, handling transitions, and building resilience in organizations and individual clients. You’ll be able to see first-hand how Silicon Valley companies create a culture of creativity and innovation, and you’ll be able to talk with their leaders. We’ll arrange a customized tour for you that addresses your organization’s issues.

We can design additional customized programs and tours for individuals, families, work teams and other special interest groups. Join our email list, and visit our web site or call: (510) 845-5510 for more information.

You’ll take away essential, valuable insights that you could not achieve in any other way, while enjoying the experience of a lifetime!

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